Waiver 1115 Information

Section 1115 Medicaid waivers allow states to explore new options for providing health coverage to persons who would otherwise not be eligible and allow states to examine innovative ways to deliver care by waiving certain requirements of the Medicaid Act.

While waivers can be important tools that can help states respond to the needs of low-income individuals, they also present concerns for health advocates working to protect the rights of Medicaid enrollees and promote transparency in state waiver processes.

Sec. 1115 of the Social Security Act allows the Secretary of Health and Human Services to waive some requirements of the Medicaid Act so that states can test novel approaches to improving medical assistance for low-income people.

Under the current administration, several states are seeking waivers to impose harmful cuts and restrictions. The first set of harmful waivers have been approved for Kentucky and Arkansas, with a number of states seeking to enact similar changes to Medicaid. Learn more about Medicaid waivers and how the National Health Law Program is combating the Trump administration’s illegal use of waivers to weaken Medicaid.

View 1115 Waiver Resources By State

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  • Missouri State Court Petition to Stop Ballot Initiative

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  • Medicaid Expansion is Critical for Missouri’s Communities

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    MEDICAID EXPANSION  IS CRITICAL FOR MISSOURI?S COMMUNITIES  The Affordable Care Act (ACA) expands the Medicaid program to provide health care for millions of uninsured individuals, mainly low-income adults.  In June, the Supreme Court ruled that States can choose whether to expand their Medicaid programs.  If Missouri chooses to expand its Medicaid program (MO HealthNet) in 2014, the federal government will pay 100 percent of the cost for the first three years, with federal payments gradually reducing down to 90 percent by 2020.  This is a great deal for Missouri. Missouri should take advantage of this opportunity offered to expand Medicaid coverage to the poorest uninsured in our communities.  ? The Medicaid expansion will provide basic health insurance coverage for an estimated 255,000 low income Missourians.  Access to health insurance means healthier families and healthier communities.  ? The Medicaid expansion will cover people with incomes up to 138% of the federal poverty level, including adults without children. For a household of one, this income limit would cover non-disabled adults making up to $1285/month. Missouri?s current Medicaid program only covers adults who have minor children and make less than $234/month for a family of two (after…

  • Medicaid Expansion Would Help Missouri’s Homeless

    Medicaid Expansion Would Help Missouri?s HomelessThe Affordable Care Act (ACA) expands the Medicaid program to provide health care for millions of uninsured individuals, mainly low-income adults.  In June, the Supreme Court ruled that states can choose whether to expand their Medicaid programs. If Missouri chooses to expand its Medicaid program (MO HealthNet), thousands of uninsured people experiencing homelessness in Missouri would gain access to desperately needed healthcare that they otherwise could not afford.? In 2010 the Homeless Population in Missouri was roughly 8,122.   A national study found that 59.5% of homeless had no health insurance.   Based on the national average, over 4,800 homeless Missourians lack health insurance.  Because the Affordable Care Act allows states to expand their Medicaid programs to cover individuals with incomes up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level, nearly all of these individuals would be eligible for Medicaid if Missouri chooses to expand the program.? The need for health insurance among Missouri?s homeless population is great. People experiencing homelessness are more likely to have disabilities, injuries, or serious medical conditions like high blood pressure, cancer, pneumonia, or tuberculosis.   Nearly half of all homeless people have some history of mental illness.? Because…

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